Microsoft Release a SharePoint Migration Tool

The SharePoint Migration Tool lets you migrate your files from SharePoint on-premises document libraries or your on-premises file shares and easily move them to either SharePoint or OneDrive in Office 365. It is available to all Office 365 users.

Designed to be used for migrations ranging from the smallest set of files to a large scale enterprise migration, the SharePoint Migration Tool will let you bring your information to the cloud and take advantage of the latest collaboration, intelligence, and security solutions with Office 365.

SharePoint Migration Tool

Download and Install the SharePoint Migration Tool

You can download and install the SharePoint Migration Tool using Internet Explorer, Edge or Chrome browser.

IMPORTANT:

  • If you are using the Chrome browser, you need to install the ClickOnce for Google Chrome plug-in before installing the SharePoint Migration Tool.
  • To download and install the plug-in: Using Chrome, go to this site and then click Add to ChromeClickOnce for Google Chrome plug-in
  1. To download the tool, go to SharePoint Migration Tool.
  2. Click Install.
  3. Click Yes to allow this app.
    After downloading and installing the SharePoint Migration Tool, read How to use the SharePoint Migration Tool to help you get started.

For a video introduction and overview of how this new tool works, please see below:

 

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Introduction to Microsoft Flow

My adventures within Microsoft Office 365 continue… another new feature to Microsoft Office 365 Power Apps.

Back in November 2016, Microsoft released for general availability Microsoft Flow and PowerApps. These tools will give users the power to enable the automation of workflows and the building of custom apps, and will also ease and expedite the creation of applications without the need for complex custom software development.

Microsoft Flow IconMicrosoft Flow is a new workflow automation solution that can be used to tap application and service data, making it easy to combine different services. Microsoft Flow connects more than 35 services, including SharePoint, OneDrive, Slack, and Twitter, so that users can perform actions such as sending notifications, pushing data into Excel, sending OneDrive files to SharePoint sites, automatically copying files from Dropbox to their SharePoint document library, and creating simple workflow approval tracking. Along with this, business users will be able to use Microsoft Flow to utilise pre-built templates and create their own flows in a visual designer that can work anywhere on the web.

Below is a short video detailing how Flow will be able to automate your repetitive daily tasks:

Things To Know About The New Microsoft Teams

Microsoft unveiled Microsoft Teams at an event in New York back in November 2016. This is an Office 365 component that adds a group chat tool to the pre existing office suite.

Teams is a competitor to Slack. This web-based software pulls together messaging, archived content and search capabilities.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella described it as a “chat-based workspace” – so Teams combines informal chatting and productive collaboration. The app combines the online Office applications, Skype, Exchange servers, Azure, security and more, all in one piece of software.

It’s a lot like Slack

When viewing demos or screenshots of Microsoft Teams, you could be forgiven for confusing it with a new version of Slack. The user interfaces look extremely similar, and it uses the same general “channels” and individual/small group chat design language.

It’s a free add-on for Office 365 enterprise subscribers

Teams isn’t exactly free, but if your organization is already an Office 365 subscriber it won’t cost anything additional. Of course, that doesn’t mean it’ll just pop up on your desktop the day it launches. Like any Office component, it’ll be up to your company’s IT department whether or not to deploy it to users in the organisation.

Teams brings together the following 3 components that are essential in any collaborative effort:

Chat

Microsoft Teams is, at its base, a chat-centered team workspace that’s easy to set up. Once your team is on board (and you can have multiple, different teams), you’ll have different channels within the teams for specific conversation topics. What’s more, you can even chat with members individually. Not only can you like posts, mention people, reply directly to posts, and even save posts, you can also post in rich text formats (including subject lines, bullet points, images, etc.). The addition of emoticons, gifs, and stickers make this platform a friendly, informal way for teams to chat. It makes it a much more personal and enjoyable experience than having a bland email chain.

Files

Teams is based on Office 365 Groups. Every time you make a team, it syncs and creates a group in SharePoint Team Sites. This allows Microsoft Teams to easily integrate to OneNote, Planner, Exchange Calendar, and all sorts of files to make sharing within your team the simplest it can be. Let’s say you share a file in a channel with your team. That file will automatically be uploaded to a folder specific to that channel. The folder contains all the uploaded files of that channel, and can easily be found in Teams for later use.

Meetings

With the simple click of a button, within the chat itself, you and your team can have an audio or video meeting. Not only can you schedule these meetings, you can make them happen with no preparation by clicking the button, and having whoever is available join. Since Teams is a flexible app, you can just as easily do this from your desktop or your mobile. You and your teammates can easily share notes and files during the meeting as well. Once the meeting is over, you can find a record of it saved in the chat history for future reference.

Now that you have read all of this, lets have a look in the video below:

 

Sharing files & folders in SharePoint & OneDrive

This is a first post in a while, hopefully I will be posting more content as the year goes on focusing on Office 365 and Azure.

For now, as more and more people move over to SharePoint i get asked how can I share my content with people who don’t necessarily work in my organisation, so hopefully the steps below will help answer this question.

Sharing files and folders in SharePoint Online / OneDrive Online couldn’t be easier. The process is similar in both products so from this point on, I will refer to both products as ‘OneDrive’.

Here’s a few key features of File Sharing in OneDrive;

  • Share files within your organisation and external users
  • Control who can view or edit the shared files
  • Work together in real time (also referred to as Co-Authoring)

File Sharing

  1. Go to OneDrive for Business or the site library that has the file you want to share.

  2. Right-click the file you want to share, and then select Get a link. If you don’t see Get a link, click Share, and then click Get a link.

    Screenshot of Sharing a document by using Get a link

Choose the type of link you want to create.

Screenshot of choosing a link

Links for internal sharing:

  • Edit link – account required After they sign in, people in your organization can edit, copy, or download the file.

  • View link – account required After they sign in, people in your organization can view, copy, or download the file.

Guest links:

  • Edit link – no sign-in required People outside your organization can edit the file and may also be able to copy and download the file. People may need to sign in with a Microsoft account to copy or download the file.

  • View link – no sign-in required People outside your organization can view the file and may also be able to copy and download the file. People may need to sign in with a Microsoft account to copy or download the file.

  1. If guest access is disabled, you’ll see only account required options.

  2. If you choose a no sign-in required link and you want to set the link to expire, click Set expiration, and then choose how long before the link expires, such as 30 days. Account required links don’t expire and there’s no option to set an expiration for those links.

    Screenshot of Setting an Expiration for a guest link

  3. Click Copy to copy the link to the clipboard.

  4. Paste the link into an email and send it or post it on a website for the people you want share with.

I hope this was easy enough to follow, if you have any questions please drop me a line.

Office 365 Credential Issues

If you’ve ever connected a workstation to Office 365 and then been constantly prompted for your credentials you know how frustrating it can be.  Have you ever checked that box in Outlook to “Remember Password” and then screamed in frustration as yet another logon prompt came up?

Below is a collection of sites that can help you troubleshoot issues logging into your Office 365 account.

SharePoint Online, Sharing Content With External Users

The ability to invite external users to the Team site is enabled by default, so site owners and site collection administrators can share the Team site or any of its subsites with external users at any time. However, if you are the Office 365 admin, you can choose to disable the feature for all sites so that no future invitations can be sent. When this feature is deactivated, any external user currently invited to sites will no longer be able to access the sites.

Enabling external sharing is not the same thing as enabling anonymous access. When external sharing is enabled, users must be authenticated (by signing in) before they can access internal resources.

  1. Go to Admin > Service Settings > sites and document sharing.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Turn on external sharing
    • Turn off external sharing

Image showing the on/off control for allowing external users access to your team site and documents.

SECURITY

  • When you deactivate external sharing, any external users who had access to the site at the time the feature was deactivated are denied access to the site and no future invitations can be sent. If the feature is reactivated with external user names in the SharePoint permissions groups, then those users will automatically be able to access the site again. To permanently prevent a user from accessing the SharePoint site, you can remove them from the list of external users.
  • If external sharing is turned off globally, any shared guest links will also stop working. If the feature is later reactivated, these links will resume working. It is also possible to disable individual links that have been shared if you want to permanently revoke access to a specific document.

Remove individual external users

If you need to remove external users so that they no longer have access to sites that have been shared with them, you can do so by removing them from the list of external users in Office 365 Service Settings.

  1. Go to Admin > Service Settings > sites and document sharing.
  2. Click Remove individual external users.
  3. Select the external users you want to remove, and then click Delete (the trash can icon).

Connecting a MAC to SharePoint inc O365

A little over two years ago, I purchased my first MAC Book Pro and have not looked back since. Admittedly, the first thing I did was to install Windows as VM on it, but this was a case of having to because of my day job.

I have recently moved to PKF Cooper Parry LTD as a Infrastructure Consultant. One of my first projects is to migrate a small company’s data to O365 SharePoint. I will be delivering SharePoint training to end users next week, but have identified that the directors of the business all run from MACs.

One question to me in a planning meeting was…. Can I access SharePoint from my MAC? The answer is yes, and in some cases feels simpler to access your data than it does on a Windows PC.

Here’s how you connect your Mac with OSX to a SharePoint library — this requires Office for Mac 2011:

  1. From Spotlight look for “Microsoft Document Connection” and open it.
  2. Click on the “Add Location” button in the upper left and choose to “Connect to a SharePoint Site…”
  3. Press the Connect button.

Microsoft Document Connection, which was introduced in Office for Mac 2008 SP2 can connect to both SharePoint sites and OneDrive (not yet OneDrive for business). Multiple file upload is simple with this application – just drag and drop them into the application then everything is done. The application itself can be seen as a very lite version of SharePoint Workspace, although it doesn’t do much beyond upload, read, edit, check in/check out. You cannot delete a file, create a new folder, or edit its metadata properties in this app, and to get the latest update you need to hit Refresh button.

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The TechNet document Plan browser support in SharePoint 2013 says that Safari is “Supported”. Unfortunately “Supported” does not mean that you will get full functionality. There are a hand full of features, that still only work with ActiveX (IE8/9 on Windows,Chrome/Firefox on Windows via plugins). These are important features like: presence information, Outlook integration (stssync), multiple file upload, and so on…)